Climate Listening Project

October 12 2018
backyard

I launched the award-winning Climate Listening Project in 2014 and traveled across the United States and around the world to explore and film the connections that are important to each of us: family, faith, business, environment, community; weaving together the latest science with inspiring stories from around the globe. I am re-launching the Climate Listening Project with a new vision, not only focusing on our changing climate, but how we are changing as individuals, listening to our own realities, overcoming our fears and stereotypes, healing ourselves, and allowing ourselves to be our whole selves. I think real change is not just about acknowledging and adapting to our changing weather - it is about changing our political climate, social climate, inclusion climate, and economic climate. We all have unique and important stories, contributions, experiences, and perspectives as we listen, learn, change, and grow. The Climate Listening Project shares these stories of transformation. http://ClimateListeningProject.org

October 12 2018

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Preparation Stage

My latest post is an observation of forests in my community.


I live in a Blue Ridge Mountain forest in North Carolina. I've lived here nearly ten years. Every autumn, the leaves would start to change. Bright reds, yellows, and oranges would create a kaleidoscope of color as far as your eyes could see. Usually, the leaves would start to change color by October with peak leaf season in mid-October. This year, the leaves didn't change. Forests have stayed green - and some brown - with leaves dying and falling before changing. Just now, as we get ready to begin November, I am starting to see little pops of color. But, still nothing like in years past.

This is climate change. Already this year in 2018, we've broken the record for most rainfall ever in North Carolina. In 2017, it was the hottest year on record. In 2016, we saw record breaking forest fires with 45,000 acres charred. These climate records go back 123 years.

Articles in the news are sharing this story and reporting this lack of autumn color is happening across the mid-Atlantic states.

Stay tuned for more updates. My first Climate Listening Project expedition on National Geographic Open Explorer will share photos of inspirational, hopeful individuals in 13 countries on 6 continents working together to protect forests.

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Dayna,


Your use of imagery is very strong here! The description of the changing leaves (or lack there of) paints a disheartening picture about the reality of climate change. My town in New York is FINALLY experiencing peak fall leaf colors and it is nearly November. I too have noticed that they remain green longer and longer each year. It's wonderful that your expedition helps connect the consequences of global warming through such a diversity of locations!

I wanted to share my new Virtual Reality film "Standing Forests". This short 360 video takes you virtually to a standing forest and allows you to explore first-hand what is happening to forests around the world. I directed this video with Dogwood Alliance.


Forests - sights of lush colors, sounds of birds and insects, feeling coolness in the shade or near a river, and smelling the moss and healthy soil. Forests provide us with the clean air to breathe and clean water to drink that we all need to survive. Plus, not only do standing forests help mitigate climate change by sequestering carbon, forests help us adapt to climate change as one of our best defenses against impacts like flooding.

My first Climate Listening Project expedition on National Geographic Open Explorer will share photos of inspirational, hopeful individuals in 13 countries on 6 continents working together to protect forests.

Credits: Director: Dayna Reggero Executive Producer: Dogwood Alliance Producer: Better Than Unicorns Associate Producers: Malt Maker Media, Climate Listening Project Creative Director: Brett A McCall Cinematographers: Andrea Desky, Brett A McCall Editor and Compositor: Nate Glass Sound Designer: Robert Gowan Advisers: Lucia Ibarra, Scot Quaranda, Adam Colette

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Dayna,


The 360 video is incredibly clever and effective in spreading awareness about environmental conservation and appreciation. You and your team utilize VR technology in such proactive ways! I really felt as if I was there experiencing the forest!

Expedition Background

For my first expedition I will be sharing photos and hopeful quotes from individuals in Indonesia, Mozambique, Tasmania, China, Bolivia, Canada, Russia, Germany, Italy, Paraguay, Scotland, England, and United States - all working together to protect forests.

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