Stingray Nursery

Latest update January 10, 2019 Started on July 8, 2018
sea

When you discover a nursery area of an elasmobranch, you need to explore it more, especially when your country doesn't care about wildlife and the environment...


In a citizen science project on July of 2018 about recording the marine biodiversity on south-east Pelion in Greece, we (at Hellenic Biodiversity Center with iSea) discovered in the beach of Lyri 2 common stingrays (Dasyatis pastinaca).

And it turned out to be a nursery area of the common stingray (Dasyatis pastinaca).

July 8, 2018
Expedition's summary cannot exceed 240 characters

Tags: 
Did you know that the National Geographic Society is currently offering Explorers a variety of funding opportunities in the fields of conservation, education, research, storytelling, and technology? To learn more and apply for a grant click here.
If you're not interested in applying for a grant, click continue below
Preparation Stage

Unfortunately, in Winter, it's really hard to see what's happening undersea and that's because of the streams it has and the bad weather which mixes the sand, and it makes it unavailable to see underwater.


But here a video from last year... And waiting for the summer to have more photos / videos and more data.

Expedition Background

At the beginning of July 2018, two NGO's: BiodiversityGR and iSea were running a citizen science project in the area for recording the marine biodiversity of the area of South-East Pelion, in Greece.


On the 2nd day (at 3 of July), we have gone to explore and record the marine biodiversity of the Lyri Beach. This day Nikos Doumpas of the iSea was able to find and record for the first time two common stingrays (Dasyatis pastinaca).

Since then I was able to record the stingrays (even the young ones) and their habitats until October, which the weather didn't allow me to continue the free diving observation of the stingrays and their habitat and behavior.

But in late of the July when I have seen the newborns (and many of them), I understood that was the time to begin an Expedition (Project), so to be able to record continuously this nursery area, and their behavior.

To do that I was able to freedive (usually it was from 4 to 6 meters), and taking photos and videos with an underwater camera. But if I want to learn more, I need to use also other methods like a ROV and acoustic methods.

But the expedition already has started and more good news will come soon...

image-1 image-1 image-1

Contribute to this expedition

Name
Email Address
Contribution
Currency
Number card
Expiration
CVC
Postal Code

Review Your Contribution

You have chosen to contribute to expedition.

Confirm your details:

  • Name:

  • Email:

  • Last 4 digits:

Click below to proceed.

Thank You for Your Contribution!

Fundraising Details:

Submit/Modify

Goal
Currency
Deadline
Tell us how raising these funds will impact your expedition
You're almost there, we just need to know three more things:
Is any part or component of your project funded by the National Geographic Society or a National Geographic Society Grant?
Is anyone on your expedition/project team affiliated, either currently or in the past, with the National Geographic Society?
Did you apply for a grant/funding from the National Geographic Society for this project?
You have a goal to raise by for:
Is any part or component of your project funded by the National Geographic Society or a National Geographic Society Grant?
You’ve responded:
Is anyone on your expedition/project team affiliated, either currently or in the past, with the National Geographic Society?
You’ve responded:
Did you apply for a grant/funding from the National Geographic Society for this project?
You’ve responded:
Note:

Thank You

Fundraising is almost live!
Thank you for applying to collect contributions! We will review your request and follow up with next steps via email.
Feel free to email us if you have any questions. openexplorer@natgeo.com