Whale Graveyard
Whale Graveyard
On a remote peninsula in Chile, over three hundred sei whales beached themselves. An expedition is setting off to recover some of the bones

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On Monday, February 6, 2017, around 1:30 a.m. CST, a sonic boom shook residents of the Midwest as a bright green fireball streaked through the night sky. The sound was that of a meteor, nearly the size of a minivan, entering our atmosphere. After its fall to Earth, radar spotted the end of its journey over Lake Michigan, approximately 10 miles off the coast of Sheboygan, Wisconsin. Teen explorers from Chicago, led by scientists from the Adler Planetarium's Far Horizons program, The Shedd Aquarium, and The Field Museum, team up to take on this Underwater ROV Meteorite Hunt. Interested explorers wanted!
69posts
A thousand years ago, the ancient Maya of the Yucatan Peninsula in modern-day Mexico built towering pyramids and beautiful palaces. They charted stars and planets in the heavens and kept elaborate calendars and histories related to these celestial beings. The earth itself was also a sacred place filled with divine presence. Perhaps most sacred were the cenotes, natural wells of life-giving fresh water. These openings into the earth's surface were places where underworld deities and rain gods dwelled. Today, many cenotes function as tourist attractions. People from all over the world can venture into the Maya underworld among stalactites and stalagmites and swim in the deep blue waters of cenotes. Unfortunately, however, many cenotes have become increasingly polluted with trash and other waste. Our expedition seeks to preserve cenotes as an important part of Maya culture. We are a partnership of both Mexican and U.S. faculty, university students, teachers, and affiliated professionals. Together, we are developing curriculum for students in Mexico ages 11-14 surrounding the science and history of cenotes. Ultimately, it is our goal that young people in Yucatan will be the voice and stewards for these precious sources of freshwater and Maya heritage.
27posts
Point Lobos State Natural Reserve, a "crown jewel" of the California State Park system offers distance learning to K-12 students through the Parks Online Resources for Teachers and Students (PORTS) programs. Live interactive videoconferences are delivered from a kayak to classrooms focusing on the Marine Protected Area (MPA) of the giant kelp forest ecosystem. The underwater ROV brings the program to another level. Students witness directly the wildlife that depends upon this hidden underwater habitat.
15posts

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Our mission is to assess the current status of marine conservation work happening in coastal Ecuador and the Galapagos. My colleague is interested in water quality, surveying and sampling, and I am assisting her as a dive instructor.
4posts
In 2019 I will move to Nelson, New Zealand to take up a permanent post as a Marine Ecologist at NIWA. I am passionate about sharing my love for invertebrates and I want to share my discoveries as I meet new species in my new home.
1post
We are planning an expedition to explore the marine animals living near Iceland’s shallow hydrothermal vents, and the adaptations they may be making to these seemingly hostile yet very productive environments.
1post
Hadiboh, Hadramawt, Yemen, Jan 31 to Mar 1 2018
Dragon's Blood Island: Socotra
It is one of the most remarkable places in the world, situated between mainland Yemen and Somalia. Some of you will know this place, but most will not. We’re attempting a scouting expedition to an island that has been called ‘the Galapagos of the Indian Ocean’, ‘the jewel of the Arabian Sea’ and the ‘most alien looking place on Earth’.

Recent Observations

First test dive with the Trident This week I received the Trident from OpenROV. I was not expecting it before January, so it was a nice surprise. After getting familiar with the hardware and making all the necessary software updates, I took it on a test dive. I initially wanted to test it in the ocean right by my house but seeing all the kelp floating around made me a little bit anxious. All I wanted to know for this first dive was how hard/easy it was to control the Trident. Until I knew this, getting tangled in kelp didn’t seem like a good idea. So, I went to Thetis Lake instead, a lake few kilometers away from where I leave. There is nothing too exciting in this lake, but at least there were no big waves or kelp. Good conditions to get started. After about 15 minutes, I was getting used to the controls and was able to go where I wanted in a relatively smooth fashion. The compass, tilt and depth meters on the cockpit display appeared to be essential for navigation. Without these, it would be very easy to get disoriented. The lights are surprisingly powerful and allow to have a good image even at depth where it is very dark. As I expected, there was nothing too crazy to see in the lake. Only a few cans of beer and branches. But at least now I am more comfortable with controlling the Trident. Next step, the ocean!
Check out Current Conservation's latest issue on marine pollution! I've written an article on my work in Hong Kong during my PhD. A lot of the work I'll be undertaking in the Andaman islands will be using these research practices and methodologies. https://www.currentconservation.org/categories/spotlight/page/2/Illustrated by Amyth Venkataramaiah
A decade ago, I was making my first steps in the field for Marine biology, passionate by the African manatee that I heard about for the first through an assignment essay during my Master program where I was asked to make a literature review of aquatic megafauna of Cameroon. It was not my favorite topic by then, and I was thrilled by emblematic animals like giraffe, lions, and elephants because they received higher media and public attention. However, as I dove into my assignment, I sadly realized that the aquatic megafauna species of Cameroon such as the African manatee were poorly known and seriously threatened by hunting for delicacy and accidental catch. The aesthetical value of our coastal waters and the magnificence of its biodiversity are hidden from the local public because they are underexplored. Like in most developing countries, marine research and exploration are scant because of the limited logistic and domestic skills. That was the same challenges my new passion for marine wildlife had to face. I use two main cost-effective strategies to get around those obstacles: (1) through using a participatory approach where fishermen use their smartphones and the SIREN mobile App to share pictures and information of opportunistic sighting of surfacing or accidentally captured marine wildlife on a publicly accessible webpage (http://siren.ammco.org/web/en/)..) (2) In areas with good enough water clarity, I am going to use an underwater technology like drone and hydroacoustics to explore life below the water surface, where many human eyes can't always reach, and then share the story of our exploration with the public.I worked with a team of young dedicated and enthusiastic marine scientists that I trained and who joined my project, and we are making this happy journey together. I will introduce my team member in my future posts. My team and I are preparing to launch our first underwater drone mission this coming January. This expedition will take place in the northern coast of Cameroon, offshore Limbe city. We are very curious to know what our drone will reveal. off course we will keep you posted, stay connected. Check out our the video below to learn about some of the other work will do when we are on the field.

Pristine Seas

Exploring and protecting the last wild places in the ocean