Whale Graveyard
Whale Graveyard
On a remote peninsula in Chile, over three hundred sei whales beached themselves. An expedition is setting off to recover some of the bones

Popular Expeditions

Show all
All
Air
Land
Sea
Urban
Backyard
On Monday, February 6, 2017, around 1:30 a.m. CST, a sonic boom shook residents of the Midwest as a bright green fireball streaked through the night sky. The sound was that of a meteor, nearly the size of a minivan, entering our atmosphere. After its fall to Earth, radar spotted the end of its journey over Lake Michigan, approximately 10 miles off the coast of Sheboygan, Wisconsin. Teen explorers from Chicago, led by scientists from the Adler Planetarium's Far Horizons program, The Shedd Aquarium, and The Field Museum, team up to take on this Underwater ROV Meteorite Hunt. Interested explorers wanted!
77posts
A thousand years ago, the ancient Maya of the Yucatan Peninsula in modern-day Mexico built towering pyramids and beautiful palaces. They charted stars and planets in the heavens and kept elaborate calendars and histories related to these celestial beings. The earth itself was also a sacred place filled with divine presence. Perhaps most sacred were the cenotes, natural wells of life-giving fresh water. These openings into the earth's surface were places where underworld deities and rain gods dwelled. Today, many cenotes function as tourist attractions. People from all over the world can venture into the Maya underworld among stalactites and stalagmites and swim in the deep blue waters of cenotes. Unfortunately, however, many cenotes have become increasingly polluted with trash and other waste. Our expedition seeks to preserve cenotes as an important part of Maya culture. We are a partnership of both Mexican and U.S. faculty, university students, teachers, and affiliated professionals. Together, we are developing curriculum for students in Mexico ages 11-14 surrounding the science and history of cenotes. Ultimately, it is our goal that young people in Yucatan will be the voice and stewards for these precious sources of freshwater and Maya heritage.
29posts
I am following a group of Black scuba divers, historians and archaeologists who are searching for, documenting and helping to excavate slave trade shipwrecks around the globe.
28posts

Latest Expeditions

Show all
All
Air
Land
Sea
Urban
Backyard
Follow along as we explore and observe marine invertebrate diversity around San Salvador in the Bahamas. This year we will start a photo/video record of specific locations to observe annual changes in growth and diversity.
1post
Vietnam has been part of one of the worlds largest ancient maritime trade routes. Now two recently discovered sites, a group of 9th to 19th-century shipwrecks and Neolithic island burials, will help tell us more about this unknown history.
1post
The aurora borealis, or Northern Lights, is an inspiration! Unfortunately, the powerful solar plasma that causes the phenomenon, can also damage our modern technology. Follow our ESA and NSC Social Space Event as we explore and share!
1post
Providenciales and West Caicos, Providenciales and West Caicos, Turks and Caicos Islands, Jan 1 to Jan 11 2019
Treasure Hunting in Caribbean Caves
What do pirates and the centipede-like remipedes have in common? They're both known to dwell hard-to-reach caves in the Caribbean. Through this portal we'll bring these rarely visited locales and poorly understood critters to your screen.

Recent Observations

Evódio Rafael AmadeAge: 27 Profession: Member of PRM (Police of the Republic of Mozambique) Birthplace: Nampula, Mozambique Why He Is Involved: Protecting people and enforcing the rules are a part of his work anyway, so safeguarding the country’s maritime resources seemed like a natural extension to him.
Marcelino AdelinoAge: 40 Profession: Sailor Birthplace: Memba, Mozambique Why He Is Involved: He used to dream about being a diver one day. And now, as a member of the Mozambican Navy, he realized the #slavewrecks training was the perfect opportunity to realize his dreams.
Post # 11.Sounds from the Amazon! In the summer of 2012, I had the opportunity of joining an annual ecological survey of the Pacaya-Samiria National Reserve (PSNR) in Peru under the umbrella of Operation Wallacea. PSNR is contained within the confluence of the Marañón and Ucayali Rivers where the main-stem of the Amazon River originates more than 3,000 km from the Atlantic Ocean. I stayed for 4 weeks at a base camp on the very remote Samaria River working from the historic riverboat, the R/V Rio Amazonas. Base Camp I observed, collected and recorded fish from a small dock located at the base camp, and from small motor boats and canoes from which we conducted twice-daily fishing surveys. Fishing with cane poles Fishing with gill nets Although staying in the same location for four weeks might seem monotonous, it was amazing how much the sights changed daily. I was there during the low water season when the vast amounts of water recedes from the flooded forest and lakes. Flooded forest Vegetation choking off river as it recedes Because of this rapidly receding water, different species of fish would be forced to migrate out of the flood zone and down the river as their species tolerances were reached. For example, these photographs taken from on deck of the Rio Amazonas show some of the thousands of cory and doradid catfish, like the ones you may have in your home aquarium, migrating down the river. Cory catfish migration Dorid catfish migration Below you can view a short movie clip of vast number of Palometa fish (multiple species) migrating out of the lake and forest and moving downstream. Remember my post on fish fart and how many fishes need to gulp air at the surface (see post # 9)? Well that’s what all these migrating fishes are doing, though in this case I did not hear any evidence of FRTs or other air movement sounds. Auditioning When working at the base station, I was able to set up a fish holding and auditioning center right on the floating dock. I would first audition a specimen in a kiddy pool and then in the river by holding it gently under water near a hydrophone. However, I was only able to record here when the engines and electrical generators of the support ships were turned off (we had electricity for only 8 hours of the day, split between morning, noon, and night). So basically, in addition to participating on two surveys per day, I also got up at daybreak, and stayed up well after 10 pm, to record at the dock (not much sleep for me!). Dock work station During the fishing surveys, I had to make do with auditioning in a small plastic tube and then in the river. All fish were released after auditioning Piranha comparison So far, we have measured and processed thousands of fish sounds from the auditioning and soundscape recordings. We recently published a comparison of Piranha sounds demonstrating the potential of passive acoustic monitoring of Piranha in the Amazon. My colleagues and I are now working to describe the soundscape of the study area. On of the interesting findings is the apparent strong impact of piranha feeding on the local fishes (hmm, ouch!) Listen to a recent Scientific American 60 second podcast: Podcast Sample sounds For more information, and lots more sound samples, go to my web page at: The Amazon Soundscape Platydoras armatulus Listen Red Piranha, Pygocentrus nattereri Listen Agamyxis pectinifrons Listen

Pristine Seas

Exploring and protecting the last wild places in the ocean