Whale Graveyard
Whale Graveyard
On a remote peninsula in Chile, over three hundred sei whales beached themselves. An expedition is setting off to recover some of the bones

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On Monday, February 6, 2017, around 1:30 a.m. CST, a sonic boom shook residents of the Midwest as a bright green fireball streaked through the night sky. The sound was that of a meteor, nearly the size of a minivan, entering our atmosphere. After its fall to Earth, radar spotted the end of its journey over Lake Michigan, approximately 10 miles off the coast of Sheboygan, Wisconsin. Teen explorers from Chicago, led by scientists from the Adler Planetarium's Far Horizons program, The Shedd Aquarium, and The Field Museum, team up to take on this Underwater ROV Meteorite Hunt. Interested explorers wanted!
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We're on a mission to unveil the secret world of feather stars, from shallow to mesophotic depths, micro-world to voracious predators that feast on them. Enjoy the adventure!
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I'm a sketch biologist sketching my way through the "seabird capital of the world"—New Zealand. I'm living out of a car and tent, hitching boat rides to remote islands, climbing down sea cliffs, and being chased by sea lions while pursuing penguins, prions, storm-petrels, shearwaters, shags, gulls, gannets, mollymawks, and more. Meanwhile I'm joining New Zealanders in their extraordinary efforts to save seabirds, the fastest declining group of birds worldwide.
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Vietnam has been part of one of the worlds largest ancient maritime trade routes. Now two recently discovered sites, a group of 9th to 19th-century shipwrecks and Neolithic island burials, will help tell us more about this unknown history.
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Students at GEMS World Academy- Chicago want to use an R.O.V. to examine the health of the Chicago River, Lake Michigan, and other water ways that define our city.
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Follow along as we disseminate marine biology and science! By showing how life flows in the ocean, complemented by our lab research, we hope to sensitize both mature and young minds towards nature and higher environmental awareness.
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Santa Barbara Harbor, 132 Harbor Way Ste A, Santa Barbara, California 93109, United States, Oct 16 2018
Where's the Wakame?
A globally invasive seaweed, called Wakame or "Undaria pinnatifida", has recently been spotted in a marine protected area at Anacapa Island off the coast of southern California. It was likely spread there by hitchhiking on a local boat residing in one of three nearby harbors. To prevent another introduction event from occurring, it is important to learn where in these harbors the invasive seaweed is growing. We propose to use a Trident ROV to survey all the marinas in three harbors closest to Anacapa Island to identify these hotspots and help focus outreach and control efforts.

Recent Observations

For over a decade Vietnam Maritime Archaeology Project, VMAP, has been involved with training Vietnamese archaeologists to become maritime archaeologists and help establish their Department of Maritime Archaeology. VMAP has initiated a variety of projects including the search for a 13th-century Mongol invasion fleet sunk by the Vietnamese to trying to find shipwrecks involved in the Maritime Silk Route trade. In 2019 two teams of self-funding volunteers will investigate sites recently found by VMAP. The first is a Neolithic site on an outer island of Ha Long Bay that may show that the people occupying this site were part of early island migration. The second is a bay in central Vietnam that has five shipwrecks from the 9th to the 19th that were carrying cargos of exquisite Chinese Ceramics.
Second step – Water landing (30 December 2018) My drone floats on water (at least it says on the website that it’s waterproof – Apparently, I could simply just throw it out in the water and it will float). I don’t plan to throw it out but I definitely need landing it on the water if I want to record underwater sounds. Thus, the next step was to test the water landing and taking off. We transformed this test in a family adventure. After a fifteen-minutes’ drive we arrived at Thetis Lake. While my husband was inflating the boat, I was preparing my drone. Soon, kids and husband were in the boat and rowed to a suitable place where I could land my drone and they could have a good visual on it. Unlocking the motors, taking off, heading to the landing zone, slow descent, landing on water, and locking the motors. This was the sequence of events that I had mentally practiced in the previous days. After few minutes spending to orient myself (Where my drone is? Where my drone goes?), I was able to localize the landing zone and to head to it. Landing was not so difficult, and I was able to lock the motors of the drone. After a while, I tried to unlock the motors of the drone but it was not working – Mayday! Mayday! I could not communicate anymore with my drone!!! I experienced a brief moment of panic then I realized that I hit the pairing button by mistake (this button is for binding the remote controller with the drone). Phew! After fixing my error, I was finally able to unlock the motors of the drone, then I took off and headed back to where I was. *Landing on water and locking the motors: check! *Unlocking the motors and taking off from water: check! *Underwater video recording: check! This water landing was successful, and I became very excited to start testing the drone with the acoustic recorder.
And we’re off! After years of planning, on 17 January 2019, the R/V Song of the Whale (SOTW) sailed out of Beaufort, NC, to begin the first leg of the #MAPS2019 research cruises. The plan is that SOTW will sail survey lines for 14 days in each leg - there will be three legs in total and in between the boat will come back to Beaufort for restocking and swapping crew etc. The turn around is 24 hours and away they go again. Well that's the plan anyway! Except there’s the weather… we just heard there's some gnarly weather coming so the team are coming back to port now to avoid it. Meanwhile, here’s a message we received from the Chief Scientist on board, Dr Doug Nowacek of Duke University Marine Lab: First update! Southernmost trackline done, most of it in the dark, lots of sperm whales through the night. Heading NE now on the second trackline, trying to get it done before we get a puff of wind, probably be off effort for ~12 hrs, then back to it. Big sighting of the day was a sei whale! sea state was ~3, good thing they have big dorsal fins! More to come...

Pristine Seas

Exploring and protecting the last wild places in the ocean