Whale Graveyard
Whale Graveyard
On a remote peninsula in Chile, over three hundred sei whales beached themselves. An expedition is setting off to recover some of the bones

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On Monday, February 6, 2017, around 1:30 a.m. CST, a sonic boom shook residents of the Midwest as a bright green fireball streaked through the night sky. The sound was that of a meteor, nearly the size of a minivan, entering our atmosphere. After its fall to Earth, radar spotted the end of its journey over Lake Michigan, approximately 10 miles off the coast of Sheboygan, Wisconsin. Teen explorers from Chicago, led by scientists from the Adler Planetarium's Far Horizons program, The Shedd Aquarium, and The Field Museum, team up to take on this Underwater ROV Meteorite Hunt. Interested explorers wanted!
90posts
A global expedition to find, study, and protect the world's largest and rarest fish before they disappear forever.
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We're on a mission to unveil the secret world of feather stars, from shallow to mesophotic depths, micro-world to voracious predators that feast on them. Enjoy the adventure!
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I will be travelling across the Pacific Ocean on SV Paradigme 2 collecting observations for INaturalist. As I sail from California to Hawaï and French Polynesia, I will be taking pictures of wildlife encountered along the journey.
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As part of Pelagos mission, we are going to explore the secret reefs of Cahuita National Park in Limón, Costa Rica. Our main goal is to explore unknown coral reefs at depths greater than 50 meters, looking for Lionfish and Acroporids.
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Join young explorers from rural Michigan as they Join Hands with students and teachers in American Samoa to explore the ocean, share knowledge, culture and a love of the ocean. Expedition dates are August 14-29, 2019.
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Aug 1 2019
Eavesdropping on the Okavango Delta
Tapping into the vibrant soundscape of Botswana's Okavango Delta, to extract ecologically relevant information.

Recent Observations

For the last 6 years I have been living aboard and travelling across the oceans on SV Paradigme 2.0. I have travelled more 30 000 nm offshore up to now. Visited the Caribbean, the Azores, the Galapagos Islands, Malpelo, San Benedicto and many other remote islands along the way. At this point Sv Paradigme 2.0 is a proven blue water passage maker. It has all the required equipment to maximise safety at sea. Satellite data transmission is available on-board. The boat just went through anextensive re-fit and upgrade process to enhance it's safety, confort and autonomy while maximizing the use of renewable energy. It is ready for the open ocean again. I now want to add a scientific purpose to my ocean adventures. The initial intent would be to contribute observations to I-Naturalist. I would love to collaborate with any scientific project that would have a data collection need in the Pacific. Wether I am assigned a data collection protocol or if I can safely bring a small scientific team to a remote Pacific atoll, I would consider any request made by a serious scientific project. The video included in the link show the images from my trip San Benedicto Island. Part of the images were captured while free diving. The SCUBA diving action was realized thanks to the support of friends of mine from SV Bella Nave who had a compressor on-board their boat. The video is a good showcase of the available capability that SV Paradigme 2.0 brings to an expedition. I am actively looking into the option of procuring an ROV in order to maximise my ability to collect observations safely to greater depths then would be reachable through SCUBA diving. Looking forward to inputs from this community. I strongly believe in the concept of Citizen science. I hope that I can use my ocean going adventures to help in scientific data collection! Thanks in advance for passing the word around!
We first met at the restaurant next to the hotel to discuss our plans for the day. Then, we drove around the island and got lots of picture and video footage of the Island's scenery. We later drove back to the hotel, got ready and hopped in the water for a short snorkel. During our time underwater we saw lots of cool fish surrounding the surface of the coral and we even saw a blue starfish! Now, we are enjoying dinner at the Goat Island Cafe and enjoying our own ocean view. Tomorrow we plan to finish setting up for the workshop that will begin on Monday.
I’m Susan von Thun and I work in MBARI’s video lab. The video lab is the group that takes all of the video produced from the many MBARI video platforms and archives it in a centralized video library. We watch the video, making observations about the ocean life, habitat, equipment and anything of interest that we see. Over three decades of video observations has yielded a database filled with incomparable deep-sea knowledge. As a result, we’ve created MBARI’s Deep-Sea Guide (http://dsg.mbari.org/dsg/home), which we use to help our scientists identify what they find, but we’ve also made this public, so you too, can peruse this valuable resource to learn more about the life we see on ROV dives. Having this role at MBARI means that I’ve watched and analyzed thousands of hours of video from our remotely operated vehicles (ROVs). I’ve also spent countless hours in the control room spotting tiny, transparent animals that most people don’t notice until we stop and zoom in with the camera. My expertise is midwater animals—the ones that swim in the waters well below the surface, but never touch the seafloor. Kakani and her group have come up with a list of animals that they would like to further study with all of the imaging tools they’ve developed and I’m here to help them find those animals! In addition to spending lots of time in ROV Doc Ricketts’ control room, it has been fun to work with Dale Graves and the ROV pilots in the Mini ROV’s control van on this expedition. The Mini ROV is a small, portable system that can be shipped with its control van anywhere in the world. One of MBARI’s missions—to bring the lab into the ocean—can be seen in action everywhere I look on this expedition. We’ve got experts in biology, physics, mathematics, and engineering collaborating on challenging problems to learn more about how life on our ocean planet thrives. They are bringing tools used on land into the harsh environment of the deep sea—a formidable challenge. The high-tech tools, when integrated with underwater vehicles like ROVs are allowing us to study these animals in their habitats and get insights we never could gain in the lab. I’m also MBARI’s social media specialist, so be sure to check out our Twitter and Instagram accounts (@MBARI_news), which we’ve been updating while at sea. This science team is especially adept at using Twitter to communicate their work in a an informative, yet entertaining way!

The S.E.E. Initiative

Empowering people to explore and protect the ocean