Whale Graveyard
Whale Graveyard
On a remote peninsula in Chile, over three hundred sei whales beached themselves. An expedition is setting off to recover some of the bones

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On Monday, February 6, 2017, around 1:30 a.m. CST, a sonic boom shook residents of the Midwest as a bright green fireball streaked through the night sky. The sound was that of a meteor, nearly the size of a minivan, entering our atmosphere. After its fall to Earth, radar spotted the end of its journey over Lake Michigan, approximately 10 miles off the coast of Sheboygan, Wisconsin. Teen explorers from Chicago, led by scientists from the Adler Planetarium's Far Horizons program, The Shedd Aquarium, and The Field Museum, team up to take on this Underwater ROV Meteorite Hunt. Interested explorers wanted!
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A global expedition to find, study, and protect the world's largest and rarest fish before they disappear forever.
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We're on a mission to unveil the secret world of feather stars, from shallow to mesophotic depths, micro-world to voracious predators that feast on them. Enjoy the adventure!
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Marine biologists are unanimous: the Mediterranean monk seal is a highly threatened species, yet their numbers seems to be growing. The development of new tools may be useful to scientists that study this magnificent marine mammal.
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Sharks are declining worlwide. This project trip will compare shark abundance found in the Galapagos Archipelago with non-protected waters of coastal Ecuador, Costa Rica and Colombia.
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An expedition set up by volunteers exploring Gogland, the largest island of the Finnish Gulf
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Ilha do Marajó, Soure, Pará, Brazil, Jan 20 2019 to May 3 2019
The Mangrove Killifish
The main goal of this expedition is to disentangling the distribution of the mangrove amphibious killifish, amazing and tiny estuarine fish that live in magrove forest pools. Our focus now is in the mouth of the Amazon river.

Recent Observations

The real adventure begins at last ! With the help of favorable winds, our faithful sailing boat took us in no time from Lefkas to our undisclosed destination in the Ionian Sea. Unfortunately, we are not at liberty to indicate where the monk seals are. There is a real risk that with this information, tourist operators will begin sending too many boats with people eager to see the animals with their own eyes. The truth is that this threatened marine mammal has been hunted to the brink of extinction, and therefore is fearful of man’s presence. Too much hassle can cause many problems, such as mother’s abandoning their pups, animals panicking or simply leaving the zone, never to be seen again. It’s not a surprise that for the past decades, the remaining individuals have chosen secluded and hidden marine caves to rest and give birth. They certainly don’t enjoy all of this sudden attention. That being said, there are currently sailing charters and tour operators that play a very important role in raising awareness about the monk seal’s dire situation. Even though the boats packed with snorkelers regularly come to this location, the owners ask the tourists not to approach the caves and stay in a well defined area for a short period of time. This ensures that the animals are not disturbed. We witnessed with our own eyes that with this sort of practice, the animals don’t seem to mind the presence of man. Hopefully, most of the tour operators will adopt these kinds of best practices, and not only with monk seals, but with all of the marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Let’s all fight for better touristic future, with less impacts on the places we love to visit ! Now, back to our expedition: we were lucky to experience calm weather for our first day on location. This allowed us to start installing the autonomous monitoring system. We also spotted our first monk seals, and there seems to be more individuals than last year at the same period. It all looks very promising for the next few days.
Virtually very thing the Turks &. Caicos Reef Fund does requires approval of the Turks & Caicos Islands Government's Department of Environment and Coastal Resources (DECR). Consequently, we work hard to maintain a close working relationship with DECR. One of our big projects that help to protect the reefs of the TCI is our moorings effort. Under a Memorandum of Understanding between the TCRF and DECR, TCRF has been designated as the lead NGO for the installation and maintenance of moorings. Since we started this effort, we have more than doubled the number of scuba moorings around the TCI, added over a dozen snorkel boat moorings where there were previously none and replace all the inappropriate sea floor anchors for moorings (e.g., chains wrapped around coral heads) with proper sea floor anchors. In the video, two of our DECR helpers are drilling a hole in dead coral so a new rock pin anchor can be installed. In the photo, two other volunteers are finishing a mooring line hook-up to a newly installed rock pin anchor which has been epoxied into a hole drilled in the hard bottom. One of the challenges we face in monitoring the health of our mooring lines is that to check on the condition of the sea floor anchor and the mooring line itself, we need to send a diver in the water. Since all of our scuba boat moorings are in 40-50 feet (or more) of water, the diver ends up doing a very short dive, essentially a bounce dive. Having an underwater drone to inspect the moorings would lead to increased safety for our volunteer divers as we would only have to put a diver in the water if there was a problem spotted from the drone footage.
The matts of Sargassum washing up in Bermuda lately have been the largest and most sustained in recent memory. This has created problems in some cases and opportunities in others (especially for photography and filming). Please stay tuned for many more posts once we take a break from filming. As a teaser here is the eye of a diminutive yet almighty Sargasso Fish as submitted to the Nat Geo One Shot, please follow and LIKE if you do :) https://on.natgeo.com/2WMrhaG

Pristine Seas

Exploring and protecting the last wild places in the ocean