Whale Graveyard
Whale Graveyard
On a remote peninsula in Chile, over three hundred sei whales beached themselves. An expedition is setting off to recover some of the bones

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On Monday, February 6, 2017, around 1:30 a.m. CST, a sonic boom shook residents of the Midwest as a bright green fireball streaked through the night sky. The sound was that of a meteor, nearly the size of a minivan, entering our atmosphere. After its fall to Earth, radar spotted the end of its journey over Lake Michigan, approximately 10 miles off the coast of Sheboygan, Wisconsin. Teen explorers from Chicago, led by scientists from the Adler Planetarium's Far Horizons program, The Shedd Aquarium, and The Field Museum, team up to take on this Underwater ROV Meteorite Hunt. Interested explorers wanted!
80posts
Hawksbill sea turtles are particularly threatened in the Eastern Pacific ocean, with only 500 nesting females left in the whole region. We have discovered that a small population of juvenile hawksbill sea turtles uses the rocky reefs around the waters of Costa Rica to feed and grow. Join me as I explore the Pacific coast of Costa Rica, studying these animals, following their movements, and working with the local communities to ensure the survival of this species.
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The Strategic Mobilization of Autonomous Research Technologies for Bay Assessment, Restoration, and Conservation. This pilot project will address the need for a program that combines technologies with persistent outreach and education, focusing on citizen scientists and students, engendering community involvement and activity. This approach supports a road-map towards a Chesapeake bay holistic 4D assessment such that restoration and conservation can better support the ecology and economy of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. This program is designed such that it fulfills this need and lays a foundation for continual outreach and community engagement by bringing together technology subject matter experts from public and private sectors as educators and infuse development and deployment skills needed to continue restoring the Chesapeake Bay to a vibrant and strong economically sound biologically diverse ecosystem.
39posts

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In August 2019, Riparia will bring 10 diverse young Canadian women on a five-day canoe expedition to the Poisson Blanc Regional Park to learn about freshwater science, and help document the status of local freshwater ecosystems.
3posts
Utilizing a collaborative-participatory approach to map and explore remote mountainous areas of Armenia.
9posts
We're excited to study the habitat and other ecosystem services provided by restorative ocean polyculture and explore ocean polyculture as a vehicle for kelp restoration and conservation.
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England, United Kingdom, Apr 3 2015 to Feb 28 2019
The Black Bream Project
Documenting the secret breeding lives of black seabream off the UK’s Jurassic Coast for the very first time. By Matt Doggett, Martin Openshaw, Sheilah Openshaw and Polly Whyte

Recent Observations

RECAP AND NEW ADVENTURES Hey! For the first time readers, let me re-introduce myself, my name is Laura-Ashley Henderson. I graduated from The University of The West Indies with a B.Sc. in Biology, with specializations in marine biology and ecology and environmental biology. I am an aspiring marine biologist, adventurer and 100% water baby and am currently lucky enough to be one of the lead team members for the upcoming expedition for this project! It’s been a while since myself, Hannah Lochan, Stacey-Ann Sarjusingh, Diva Amon, Katy Croff Bell or Alexis Hope have written, so it’s good to recap. My Deep Sea, My Backyard, a pilot project aimed to increase ocean exploration, scientific knowledge and deep-sea awareness using low cost technology. We are using technology such as Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) and Nat Geo Drop Cameras to explore Trinidad and Tobago’s waters. We hope to discover new marine species, communities and habitats. For further background information, check out this blog entry http://openexplorer.nationalgeographic.com/expedition/trinidadtobagooceanexploration/view/6000967 • This pilot project began in August 2018 with a mega stakeholder workshop introducing the project , discussing ideas and networking. The workshop continued with a smaller team, to learn more about the deep-sea environment and usage of the Drop Cameras. We completed the workshop by successfully deploying the drop camera and ROVs multiple times Down De Islands. Read more http://openexplorer.nationalgeographic.com/expedition/trinidadtobagooceanexploration/view/6002053 •After the workshop, we had a month of downtime and then our first solo deployment! Unfortunately, it did not go as expected… the Drop Camera was recovered however; (dun, dun, dun…….) we ran into trouble as the video footage could not be downloaded. The drop camera needed fixing, making this the first obstacle encountered. Read more http://openexplorer.nationalgeographic.com/expedition/trinidadtobagooceanexploration/view/6003205 •To ensure that the camera was ready to use and “A-OKAY”, in December 2018, Alan Turchik from Nat Geo visited Trinidad to do repairs on the camera. Unfortunately, we realized the Drop Camera’s malfunction was a bigger issue than expected. The cameras needed to be returned to Washington DC for more complex repairs. •In order to move the project forward, I was given the opportunity to go to the hidden gem of an island, Bermuda. My dream was becoming a reality. The trip allowed me to gain further training using the Drop Cameras in an offshore environment as well as network with experienced professionals. Over the next few weeks, I’ll be posting about my Bermuda Experience here! Blue waters, great video footage (hint: we saw some pretty cool stuff!), pictures and lots more so stay tuned! WHAT’S NEXT? So here goes, I am CONFIDENT AND READY to find out what’s in Trinidad and Tobago’s unexplored waters. We will be writing and posting more blogs every week. Prepare for the behind-the-scenes, unfiltered details! We would love for you to join us on this journey! Stay tuned!
Our underwater drone is now up and running! Before using it in the turbid waters of the New York Harbor where underwater visibility is limited, we decided to do a test-run in the Bronx River. In this river, the drone did remarkably well, and we were able to see the fluvial ecosystem in motion as several fish darted by. However, the conditions of the New York Harbor and the surrounding waters are quite different from those in the Bronx River, and the environment is much more variable. When we trialed our underwater drone, the sea state and current conditions made it difficult to test. While our first trial day was unsuccessful, we have high hopes for the potential of this drone in aiding our research. After refining our understanding of how and when to use the underwater drone, it will be an invaluable resource for our acoustic recorder deployments. Placement and retrieval of our acoustic recorders currently depend on support from the New York Aquarium dive team, who brave near-freezing waters in winter to insure the success of our deployments. With the help of the underwater drone, we will be able to assess new deployment sites and perform other tasks without endangering our divers. Moreover, when divers are needed for a specific research task, the drone will create safer conditions by providing a comprehensive underwater assessment of the sea state. Our drone will also enable us to safely check the conditions of our recorders throughout their deployment, even during particularly harsh and cold winter months. Not to mention, it may catch new and interesting footage of New York’s underwater neighbors! We are now gearing up for our next trial day with our underwater drone; stay tuned!
NATURAL ARTIFICIES At first glance it would look like someone has cut a rectangle in the rock, a pretty strange way to cut if you want to extract a block of stone, the logical thing would have been to cut it from front and not in a position that would make the whole operation uncomfortable. This thought comes from our belief that we are looking at a natural rock formation where some men have been working. But if we assume that we are seeing an artificial construction, the image takes on another meaning. If that formation is not natural, then a block that must be under the sand has come off quite sure, and the rest of what we see is artificial. In that way, many of the things that we have been seeing become more comprehensible, although There is no doubt that it costs a lot to admit it We have preconceived ideas about what a city should look like under the sea, it is a romantic and imaginative scenario, suggestive and totally invented, originated in the human mind. But something like what we see on this site does not fit that fantasy, reality never does. The sea has its processes, and time its effects, and here we see how the sea and time engulf and assimilate a city or something similar, a process that, surely, has occurred before and will continue to happen, and we are lucky enough to be able to see it . ARTIFICIOS NATURALES A simple vista se diría que alguien ha cortado un rectángulo en la roca, una forma bastante extraña de cortar si quieres extraer un bloque de piedra, lo lógico habría sido cortarla de frente y no en una posición que haría incómoda toda la operación. Este pensamiento procede de que creemos estar mirando una formación rocosa natural donde algunos hombres han estado trabajando. Pero si asumimos que estamos viendo una construcción artificial, la imagen cobra otro sentido. Si esa formación no es natural, de ahí se ha desprendido un bloque que debe estar bajo la arena con toda seguridad, y el resto de lo que vemos es artificial. De ese modo, muchas de las cosas que hemos ido viendo, se hacen más comprensibles, aunque no cabe duda de que cuesta muchísimo admitirlo. Tenemos ideas preconcebidas respecto al aspecto que debería tener una ciudad bajo el mar, es un escenario romántico y fantasioso, sugestivo y totalmente inventado, originado en la mente humana Pero algo como lo que vemos en este sitio no encaja en esa fantasía, la realidad nunca lo hace. El mar tiene sus procesos, y el tiempo sus efectos, y aquí vemos como el mar y el tiempo engullen y asimilan una ciudad o algo similar, un proceso que, con toda seguridad, ha ocurrido antes y seguirá ocurriendo, y nosotros tenemos la fortuna de poder verlo de cerca.

Pristine Seas

Exploring and protecting the last wild places in the ocean