Whale Graveyard
Whale Graveyard
On a remote peninsula in Chile, over three hundred sei whales beached themselves. An expedition is setting off to recover some of the bones

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On Monday, February 6, 2017, around 1:30 a.m. CST, a sonic boom shook residents of the Midwest as a bright green fireball streaked through the night sky. The sound was that of a meteor, nearly the size of a minivan, entering our atmosphere. After its fall to Earth, radar spotted the end of its journey over Lake Michigan, approximately 10 miles off the coast of Sheboygan, Wisconsin. Teen explorers from Chicago, led by scientists from the Adler Planetarium's Far Horizons program, The Shedd Aquarium, and The Field Museum, team up to take on this Underwater ROV Meteorite Hunt. Interested explorers wanted!
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Hawksbill sea turtles are particularly threatened in the Eastern Pacific ocean, with only 500 nesting females left in the whole region. We have discovered that a small population of juvenile hawksbill sea turtles uses the rocky reefs around the waters of Costa Rica to feed and grow. Join me as I explore the Pacific coast of Costa Rica, studying these animals, following their movements, and working with the local communities to ensure the survival of this species.
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The Strategic Mobilization of Autonomous Research Technologies for Bay Assessment, Restoration, and Conservation. This pilot project will address the need for a program that combines technologies with persistent outreach and education, focusing on citizen scientists and students, engendering community involvement and activity. This approach supports a road-map towards a Chesapeake bay holistic 4D assessment such that restoration and conservation can better support the ecology and economy of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. This program is designed such that it fulfills this need and lays a foundation for continual outreach and community engagement by bringing together technology subject matter experts from public and private sectors as educators and infuse development and deployment skills needed to continue restoring the Chesapeake Bay to a vibrant and strong economically sound biologically diverse ecosystem.
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An all-women team of scientists overwinters in Antarctica to investigate how diet affects the health and survival of a critical species, Antarctic krill.
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Document through conventional and underwater photography the cenotes of the Yucatan Peninsula.
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Have you ever wondered where sea creatures call home? The ocean often lacks to provide a safe refuge for them. This expedition will submerge you in the development of artificial reefs and its dynamic inhabitants in Florida’s Emerald Coast!
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Granada, Nicaragua, Oct 26 2018
Archaeology of the Zapatera Archipelago, Nicaragua
Zapatera is an archipelago situated within Lake Cocibolca, the largest lake in Central America (and the only freshwater lake in the world with sharks!). Although documentation of its pre-Hispanic history dates back to 1851, very little scientific archaeology or environmental work has taken place. This project will perform the first systematic survey of the archipelago, including an underwater component to assess submerged archaeological sites. Zapatera is uniquely situated to provide a perspective on how past people used the lake for transportation and subsistence and how multiple communities sustainably managed lake resources.

Recent Observations

The tales and trails of Turraun, a born-again wetland Under a gray March morning sky in the Irish Midlands, I met Cathy Kerwin for a walk. We followed a sometimes submerged path around a wetland called Terraun. Terraun is near where Cathy lives and she often incorporates it into her morning strolls with her Husky-Border Collie, Jaxson. The history of Terraun is an interesting one that includes a long life as a bog, followed by many generations of peat harvesting schemes, and finishes with the present, when it is finding new life as a born-again wetland. Fifty years ago, it would’ve been unthinkable to take a morning walk at Terraun. It would’ve been stripped bare of vegetation so that large machinery could scrape peat from its surface. Today, Terraun is part of the Lough Boora Discovery Park. The park is a post-industrial peatland converted to public amenity with many miles of trails. It is set in a much larger landscape of drained bogs where peat extraction is ongoing and much of the peat soil remains drained. As we walked, we passed over bare, black areas of dried out peat as well as many soggier places that have recolonized with wetland trees, grasses and other water-loving plants. This type of place is a relatively new landscape for Ireland, an industrially harvested peatland encouraged back into a wetland. As Ireland grapples with the carbon emissions from their drained peatlands, it may be a landscape that is increasingly common if they choose to re-wet land to slow carbon emissions from the bare soil. The entry sign at Terraun trails gives an inkling of all the tales the land could tell. It traces the beginning of large scale peat extraction back to the 1850s. In that stage of its mining, Terraun’s sphagnum peat moss was stripped from the top of the bog to use as horse bedding by the British Army, the sign says. The most recent industrial harvest of Terraun’s peat was carried out by the semi-state Irish company Bord na Móna. Of all the re-wetted land in the Lough Boora Discovery Park, Terraun was the first to be exhausted of peat and left to recolonize more than 25 years ago. Today in the park, Terraun is the place that has had the longest opportunity to recover some flora and fauna. The entry sign stated that more than 110 bird species and 270 plant species have been recorded on the site.
Jordan and Luke:Today we tested the water and here are the readings: High Range pH: 7.4 Ammonia: .50 ppm Nitrite: 50 ppm Nitrate: 160 ppm Although the fish look okay, the water readings for nitrite and nitrate are too high. To address the issue we added a bacterial supplement to help break down the nitrate and nitrite levels. Currently, they are swimming to the bottom and seem to be searching for food although they were already fed. They are getting bigger and gaining their parr marks (their bars). They are about 2 inches long and getting coloration on their dorsal and anal fins. Their find used to be transparent but now look more orange and are getting white, black, and red stripes. Their yolk sacs are long gone and they are eating naturally now. Their food is dead, ground up bugs. In the wild, they will catch live bugs by jumping out of the water. We will soon take the underwater drone out in the field for test drives, we can't wait to share the footage with you!

Pristine Seas

Exploring and protecting the last wild places in the ocean