Whale Graveyard
Whale Graveyard
On a remote peninsula in Chile, over three hundred sei whales beached themselves. An expedition is setting off to recover some of the bones

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On Monday, February 6, 2017, around 1:30 a.m. CST, a sonic boom shook residents of the Midwest as a bright green fireball streaked through the night sky. The sound was that of a meteor, nearly the size of a minivan, entering our atmosphere. After its fall to Earth, radar spotted the end of its journey over Lake Michigan, approximately 10 miles off the coast of Sheboygan, Wisconsin. Teen explorers from Chicago, led by scientists from the Adler Planetarium's Far Horizons program, The Shedd Aquarium, and The Field Museum, team up to take on this Underwater ROV Meteorite Hunt. Interested explorers wanted!
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Hawksbill sea turtles are particularly threatened in the Eastern Pacific ocean, with only 500 nesting females left in the whole region. We have discovered that a small population of juvenile hawksbill sea turtles uses the rocky reefs around the waters of Costa Rica to feed and grow. Join me as I explore the Pacific coast of Costa Rica, studying these animals, following their movements, and working with the local communities to ensure the survival of this species.
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The Strategic Mobilization of Autonomous Research Technologies for Bay Assessment, Restoration, and Conservation. This pilot project will address the need for a program that combines technologies with persistent outreach and education, focusing on citizen scientists and students, engendering community involvement and activity. This approach supports a road-map towards a Chesapeake bay holistic 4D assessment such that restoration and conservation can better support the ecology and economy of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. This program is designed such that it fulfills this need and lays a foundation for continual outreach and community engagement by bringing together technology subject matter experts from public and private sectors as educators and infuse development and deployment skills needed to continue restoring the Chesapeake Bay to a vibrant and strong economically sound biologically diverse ecosystem.
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A summer course at Coconut Island in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, will capture corals and coral reefs in three dimensions. Students will use photogrammetry, laser scanners, 3D printers and robots to explore the reef.
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An all-women team of scientists overwinters in Antarctica to investigate how diet affects the health and survival of a critical species, Antarctic krill.
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Document through conventional and underwater photography the cenotes of the Yucatan Peninsula.
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Lwiro, Sud-Kivu, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Aug 13 2007 to Feb 7 2019
Congo Quest for New Species
Follow the expeditions (from 2007-present) of evolutionary biologist and herpetologist Eli Greenbaum as he collaborates with an all-Congolese team of biologists to search for new species of amphibians and reptiles in remote jungles of Central Africa’s Democratic Republic of Congo. Because scientific research of biodiversity in DR Congo has been severely limited for decades, the team discovers several new species during every expedition to the country, which have been occurring nearly every year since 2007. These exciting discoveries come with a heavy price—the team must navigate a gauntlet of rebel militia, deadly tropical diseases, dangerous animals, rugged terrain, and crumbling infrastructure. This blog will tell stories about the challenges and triumphs of scientific research under some of the harshest fieldwork conditions in the world. Along the way, we will shed light on unexpected connections between science and the humanities, including surprising historical links between DR Congo and the United States.

Recent Observations

Today there is a rough estimate of around 50-60 sperm whales.We began to loose count, wherever we moved they showed up. OK, nothing like in previous years, but nonetheless they are here and they are mating. We saw at least 6 huge breaches, one was pretty much flying! Males are joining in with female groups of around 6-7 possibly more. The water is a bit milky but I am getting shots of 1s and 2s underwater. There are single females with young in tow, I swear I saw one suckling, but couldn’t, and wouldn’t get close to disturb them - thats not right unless they are right next to us.
What do you notice on your first trip to a bog? This weekend, my cousin-in-law Gary Brown came to Tullamore to visit us and I was delighted that he was up for a trip to Clara Bog. Gary is a Dublin native and says our walk on Clara Bog was his first ever visit to a bog. As we put on our wellies, I gave him a small glass jar to collect a few things he noticed, and we discussed afterward. Listen to which plants caught Gary’s eye on his first walk through a raised bog.
ON THE SAND Another cubic stone, to start, it can be said that it is not the most suitable form for a building block, which indicates that we are facing very unusual construction techniques. We have already seen how some other constructive elements do not fit with what we know about Iberians and Romans, as a whole, we have sizes and proportions that seem exclusive to this place, regardless of whether they are quarries or constructions, so that in any case all this is the work of totally unknown people. In addition it is necessary to consider that many Roman quarries of other places of Spain had been exploited long before the arrival of the Romans by towns like the Phoenicians or the Carthaginians, so that, to find a quarry does not automatically mean that it is a Roman quarry . It is possible to wonder how it is possible that a stone like this one is in sight and not buried under the sand, the logical explanation tells us that it was detached from its structure after being filled with sand, which would indicate that many built parts remained standing for a long time. EN LA ARENA Otra piedra cúbica, de entrada se puede decir que no es la forma más adecuada para un bloque de construcción, lo que indica que estamos ante técnicas constructivas muy poco habituales. Ya hemos visto como algunos otros elementos constructivos no encajan con lo que sabemos de iberos y romanos, en conjunto, tenemos tamaños y proporciones que parecen exclusivos de este lugar, independientemente de que se trate de canteras o construcciones, de modo que, en cualquier caso todo esto es obra de gentes totalmente desconocidas. Además hay que considerar que muchas canteras romanas de otros lugares de España habían sido explotadas mucho antes de la llegada de los romanos por pueblos como los fenicios o los cartagineses, de modo que, encontrar una cantera no significa automáticamente que se trate de una cantera romana. Cabe preguntarse como es posible que una piedra como ésta se encuentre a la vista y no enterrada bajo la arena, la explicación lógica nos dice que se desprendió de su estructura después de llenarse todo de arena, lo que indicaría que muchas partes construidas permanecieron en pie durante mucho tiempo.

Pristine Seas

Exploring and protecting the last wild places in the ocean