Whale Graveyard
Whale Graveyard
On a remote peninsula in Chile, over three hundred sei whales beached themselves. An expedition is setting off to recover some of the bones

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On Monday, February 6, 2017, around 1:30 a.m. CST, a sonic boom shook residents of the Midwest as a bright green fireball streaked through the night sky. The sound was that of a meteor, nearly the size of a minivan, entering our atmosphere. After its fall to Earth, radar spotted the end of its journey over Lake Michigan, approximately 10 miles off the coast of Sheboygan, Wisconsin. Teen explorers from Chicago, led by scientists from the Adler Planetarium's Far Horizons program, The Shedd Aquarium, and The Field Museum, team up to take on this Underwater ROV Meteorite Hunt. Interested explorers wanted!
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A thousand years ago, the ancient Maya of the Yucatan Peninsula in modern-day Mexico built towering pyramids and beautiful palaces. They charted stars and planets in the heavens and kept elaborate calendars and histories related to these celestial beings. The earth itself was also a sacred place filled with divine presence. Perhaps most sacred were the cenotes, natural wells of life-giving fresh water. These openings into the earth's surface were places where underworld deities and rain gods dwelled. Today, many cenotes function as tourist attractions. People from all over the world can venture into the Maya underworld among stalactites and stalagmites and swim in the deep blue waters of cenotes. Unfortunately, however, many cenotes have become increasingly polluted with trash and other waste. Our expedition seeks to preserve cenotes as an important part of Maya culture. We are a partnership of both Mexican and U.S. faculty, university students, teachers, and affiliated professionals. Together, we are developing curriculum for students in Mexico ages 11-14 surrounding the science and history of cenotes. Ultimately, it is our goal that young people in Yucatan will be the voice and stewards for these precious sources of freshwater and Maya heritage.
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A team heads to natural whale cemetery composed of over 300 sei whale skeletons in a remote area of the Taitao peninsula in Chile. Once enough bones are secured, Explorer Isaí Madriz will set off on his own to the Northern Patagonian Ice Field in search of new insect species.
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Follow along as we explore and observe marine invertebrate diversity around San Salvador in the Bahamas. This year we will start a photo/video record of specific locations to observe annual changes in growth and diversity.
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Vietnam has been part of one of the worlds largest ancient maritime trade routes. Now two recently discovered sites, a group of 9th to 19th-century shipwrecks and Neolithic island burials, will help tell us more about this unknown history.
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The aurora borealis, or Northern Lights, is an inspiration! Unfortunately, the powerful solar plasma that causes the phenomenon, can also damage our modern technology. Follow our ESA and NSC Social Space Event as we explore and share!
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Ngaparou, Thiès, Senegal, Dec 4 2018 to Feb 16 2019
The Forgotten Sirenian: Our Quest to Learn Everything about the African Manatee
We’re setting out to not only determine all threats to African manatees in 5 countries, but to learn as much as we can about their biology, ecology and their cultural importance throughout Africa. Follow along with us!

Recent Observations

China - The Human Journey > “I was a nature lover when I was a child, but I always wanted to do something for world peace. I realized one thing we can do for world peace is to protect the environment. We can start with local actions, and by helping our local area, together we can protect the entire earth.” – Wen Bo, China Environmental Paper Network Wen Bo and the CEPN are researching the impacts of skyrocketing Chinese paper consumption on tropical forests and wildlife and promoting efficient paper use by Chinese society. *My new Climate Listening Project photo series "Voices of Hope for Forests" features humans of the world – all working together to protect forests and communities as part of the Environmental Paper Network. Why are they building an international movement to match the scale of the problem? What are the sources of inspiration that sustain them? Is there hope? The recent IPCC climate report shares a grim forecast for the future of humanity, but these individuals are undeterred, and are bringing forward collaboration and solutions that deliver the forest protection and restoration needed to limit warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius.
We are ready to send out the full curriculum materials for the Masquerade Game, a low cost activity that teaches students about natural selection and ecological concepts including the impacts of predators, invasive species, and fungal diseases. It is based on the actual research done by professors at Universidad de los Andes near the Malpelo Islands. See the original research paper here: https://peerj.com/articles/2051/ If you are interested in testing out the materials, please send us an email at stef587@gmail.com. There was a lot of interest expressed in comments on previous posts. However we have no way to contact you through the Open Explorer Page. We look forward to getting feedback.
Conhecer para proteger!Exposição sobre as alterações climáticas e os oceanos No passado dia 9 de fevereiro (sábado), abriu ao público a exposição “Alterações Climáticas e os Oceanos do Futuro”, que ficará patente até dia 31 de julho no Museu do Mar Rei D. Carlos, em Cascais. Esta é uma iniciativa dos investigadores do Laboratório Marítimo da Guia do MARE-ULisboa, juntamente com o referido Museu. Fruto da vontade de 13 cientistas de 5 entidades distintas (MARE-UL, IPMA, CCMAR, FCT-NOVA e AVG), nasceram os conteúdos de uma exposição, que será itinerante para levar, não só a mensagem dos bons usos dos oceanos, como também aumentar a literacia dos oceanos. Esta exposição aborda os efeitos das alterações climáticas em geral, em habitats específicos como os recifes de coral, focando também impactos em atividades com relevância nacional tais como a pesca e a aquacultura. É, também, apresentada informação diversa sobre a investigação que se faz neste domínio no MARE, assim como exemplos de ações internacionais, nacionais e pessoais que podem ser adotadas para a mitigação das alterações climáticas. A consciência da sociedade relativamente aos impactos das alterações climáticas na vida quotidiana ainda é bastante limitada, por isso é de extrema importância sensibilizar os cidadãos para esta problemática, em especial num contexto de proximidade à zona costeira. Paralelamente à exposição, todos os envolvidos na exposição irão contribuir na dinamização desta exposição, com atividades, palestras, e encontros com convidados, até final de Julho 2019. Know to protect! Exhibition about Climate Change and the Oceans On the past February 9th (Saturday), the exhibition "Climate Change and the Oceans of Tomorrow" was opened to the public, and will be open until July 31st at the King D. Carlos Sea Museum in Cascais. This was an initiative of some researchers of the Guia Marine Laboratory, MARE-ULisbon, along with the aforementioned Museum. The contents of the exhibition were born, thanks to the will of 13 scientists from 5 distinct entities (MARE-UL, IPMA, CCMAR, FCT-NOVA and AVG). The exposition will be itinerant to carry, not only the message of the good uses of the oceans, but also to increase the ocean’s literacy. This exhibition addresses general effects of climate change in the oceans e.g. on specific habitats such as coral reef, and also focuses on the impacts in some activities with national relevance, such as fishing and aquaculture. It also presents diverse information regarding the research done in this field in MARE, as well as examples of international, national and personal actions that can be taken to mitigate climate change. The awareness of society about the impacts of climate change on daily life is still very limited, so it is of extremely important to raise awareness to this problem, especially in within coastal communities. Parallel to the exhibition, all those involved in the exhibition will contribute to its promotion with activities, lectures, and meetings, until the end of July 2019.

Pristine Seas

Exploring and protecting the last wild places in the ocean